New Ford Ranger wading capability

New Ford Ranger High-Rider models go deeper

The new Ford Ranger due to be launched in South Africa later in the year will have a best-in-class water-wading capability of 800 mm. The 4×4 and 4×2 Hi-Rider models can wade through deep water even while carrying a full load.

During the extensive water testing, Ford’s latest global compact pickup was loaded to gross vehicle mass –as heavy as it possibly could be – so that Ranger was riding at the lowest possible height.


Engineers tested Ranger over a variety of water depths and speeds. For example, they drove Ranger at 30 km/h, 50 km/h and 65 km/h through 50 mm of water , to simulate going through big long puddles on the ground. They then increased the depth at 50-mm intervals until they got to 800 mm, at which the engineers were driving through the water bath at a vehicle speed of 7 km/h, or approximately walking pace.

The water bath is 50 m long and has angled sides to replicate the bow wave that forms at the front of the vehicle as it pushes through the water. This closely simulates what happens in real life when Ranger has to wade through deep water.

“When we go through the water bath, we’re looking out for every possible functional failure in the vehicle. The most critical one would be if water was sucked through the air intake into the engine, resulting in hydro-lock, which can bend the piston’s connecting rods and potentially destroy the entire engine,” said Tom Dohrmann, the development engineer in charge of Ranger’s water management.

In the early stages of Ranger’s development, the engineers found that the alternator was too low in the Duratorq diesel engine for the 800-mm water-wading capability target. They proposed moving the alternator up high, as it would also be good for the component’s durability since dust or stones are less likely to get thrown at it during offroad driving.

For components that had to be below the water line, such as fuel tanks and rear parking sensors, they had to be suitably waterproofed to ensure they would do their job even when wet. Considering the height of the water line changes depending on whether the vehicle is moving or stationary – the water line starts higher at the front and slopes down towards the rear of the pickup when it’s moving due to changing pressure of the water – the biggest challenge for the engineers was in finding a place for all the components.

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