Suzuki Swift 1.2 GL Manual Mk2 reviewed

Suzuki Swift 1.2 GL Manual

Remember the old tyre commercial with the tag line: “Its so wide”? Well the new Swift, and it is completely new, although it looks quite like the original at first glance, is 40mm wider than the old model. That translates into a roomy cabin with enough space for all four occupants. Even the luggage area scores, the boot is now a little bigger at 268 litres.

Suzuki Swift 1.2 GL

The engine stays the same but the dash and electronic systems are all completely new.

Suzuki’s new HEARTECT platform now underpins the Swift. It integrates with Suzuki’s Total Effective Control Technology (TECT), which applies good design and clear engineering principles using very high-tensile steel to lighten the body weight, while improving crash safety.
The system was designed to integrate active and passive safety systems, including the two front-occupant airbags, ABS brakes with electronic brake-force distribution (EBD) and ISOFIX seat anchors. A significant benefit is the reduction in weight. The new Swift weighs in at 875 kg, which is a 95 kg lighter than its predecessor making it one of the lightest vehicles in the upper-B segment.

This new Swift was a top three finalist of the World Urban Car of the Year, and as the first- and second-generation models were highly popular in South Africa, with roughly 30% (or 2 966 units in 2017) of all Suzuki sales, the car should sell well.

There are three models, a base GA with five-speed manual at R159 900 and two GLs , manual and automatic.

All versions of the new Suzuki Swift are equipped with air conditioning, front and rear electric windows, power steering and remote central locking as well as a tilt-adjustable steering column, a detailed information display that includes information such as fuel consumption and range, and a security alarm and immobiliser.
On the GL-models, Suzuki adds an audio system with easy-to-use Bluetooth-connectivity and USB socket, steering wheel controls for the audio system and electrically adjustable side view mirrors. So it makes sense to go with the GL, and I would recommend the automatic at R189 900.

The interior is typical Suzuki. Functional and well thought out with ample storage spaces inside the cabin, including two front and one rear cup holder, side door pockets, a console tray box, glove box with lid and a passenger seat pocket.
The D shaped chunky steering wheel feels good in your hands and has audio system controls.

The high compression, normally aspirated 1.2L four-cylinder engine delivering 61 kW at 6 000 rpm and 113 Nm at 4 200 rpm used in the previous model is retained. This is good as it is proven, up to the job and known to be reliable and pretty frugal.

Fuel consumption is rated at 4.9 litres per 100 km in a combined cycle, giving it a real-world range of over 750 km on its 37-litre tank. I got a very frugal 5.7 L/100km which including some spirited driving on the Franschoek pass. You should be able to average close to 5 L/100km.

The Swift has a good 5-year / 200 000 km mechanical warranty and a 2-year / 30 000 km service plan.

Some of the competition in the upper-B segment include the Ford Figo, Kia Picanto, Honda Brio, Hyundai Grand i10, Toyota Agyo and Volkswagen’s up! and Vivo.

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Peugeot 208 GT-Line review

Peugeot 208 GT-Line
Feisty. Zippy. The Peugeot 208 GT-Line certainly zips along quite nicely, thank you. It has a delightfully growly 1.2 turbopetrol tricylinder engine which produces all sorts of motoring music (sounds) when encouraged with the right foot.

The 208 GT-Line is a small hatch similar in size to a VW Polo, Mazda 2, Ford Fiesta or Nissan Micra.

There is a certain Gallic touch and charm to the styling, from the feisty looking claw motive LED taillights to the aluminium door sill finishers and aluminium pedals. The piano black grill with subtle red highlights is quite assertive without being overly aggressive.

Standard features include automatic dual-zone aircon, cruise control, electric windows and mirrors and rain-sensing wipers.
The perceived build quality of the interior is good, but there are some less-premium plastic trim elements.
The 7-inch touchscreen touchscreen infotainment system is easy to use but ever so slightly outdated, for example the display option is very limited. Devices can also be connected via USB and Bluetooth and the system offers MirrorLink for Android and Apple CarPlay. The phone system is very easy to use and very clear. So the system is okay. It has the basics.
The tiny multi-function steering wheel with full leather-trimmed rim is set low and close. The dials are placed far away in a pod in front of the driver and key controls have been grouped into a touchscreen on the centre console in the centre.

Odd though is the trip computer information (including fuel consumption) displayed on the infotainment system rather than on the instrument cluster in the pod.
Very comfortable supportive seats with red detailing offer comfortable supportive seating and a great driving position. Big passengers may feel a little squished on a long road. Not a whole lot of legroom for the rear seat passengers, or headroom.

The 208’s special interior ambience, is achieved with mood lighting, and white backlighting for the instruments and controls.

Peugeot 208 GT line ready to pounce

Ride quality is quite soft, yet still firm enough to make the car feel engaging. It corners easily and instils the impression of control. Feels like fun. The 208 GT-Line has an impressive ability to soak up poor road surfaces, never losing its poise.

GT-Line’s thrumming little gem of a 1.2-litre PureTech turbocharged three-cylinder petrol engine produces 81kW and 205Nm, which together with the light body gives the car plenty of go. Other testers got 6.7-litres/100km, well off the claimed 4.5-litres/100km, but my figures were even worse at around 10L/100km, but then I tended to massage the growl pedal frequently. It is just too tempting.
Being French, it has all the safety kit you want in a car.

It costs R100k less than a Polo GTi, although understandably it does not offer quite the same performance it is not so far off in and around town. Without a doubt it is rand-for-rand a better buy.

Fun to drive, very responsive and wieldy with a pleasant, comfortable cabin. The 208 GT-Line  delivers a really nice package.

Renault Clio 88 kW Turbo GT-Line which is priced at R269 900 with a top speed of 190mk/h and 0-100km/h in 9,6 seconds, looks like real competition for the VW Polo 1,0 TSi.

The 208 comes with a 3 year or 100 000 km warranty and 45 000 km service plan.