Ford Everest Limited review

The road is mine, and the trail and the bundu. There is no hill too high for the Everest to climb. In any case that is how it feels while piloting this new update of Ford’s big SUV in SA.

Ford Everest Limited

The new Ford Everest looks much like the old one, but its how it does things that has changed.

It rides better, it goes better and the infotainment system is even better, and easily the best in this segment.

“From the value-oriented offering in the XLS 2.2 TDCi to the range-topping Everest Limited, there is a model to suit a wide range of customers, which makes it a more compelling choice than ever,” says Doreen Mashinini, General Manager Marketing at Ford Motor Company of Southern Africa.

There are now six models, in three series: XLS, XLT and Limited.

But the big news is the new engine, new gearbox and new suspension in certain models.

There are basically four drivetrain options: the new 2.0-litre Bi-Turbo and Single Turbo with the newish 10-speed automatic transmission, or the current 2.2 and 3.2-litre Duratorq TDCi with the old six-speed auto box.

Ford Everest Limited 2.0 Bi-turbo Automatic

Other new items include two-layer glossy metallic paint, 20-inch split spoke alloy wheels, although 18-inch diameter rims can be specified for the Limited, Ebony environment colour which changes the  ambience of the interior,  contrast stitching on the Limited, along with shadow chrome finishes, perforated leather and high-quality paints.

The maximum power output for the new 2.0 Bi-Turbo engine (built here in SA) is 157kW, matched to a peak torque figure of 500Nm driving all four wheels through the new 10-speed automatic transmission, in conjunction with the Terrain Management System.

The two turbos work in tandem. A small high pressure (HP) turbo works in conjunction with a large low pressure (LP) turbo, controlled with by-pass valves that determine the operating mode depending on engine speed. At lower engine speeds the two turbos work in series, enhancing torque and responsiveness, while at higher revs the small HP turbo is bypassed, and the larger LP turbo provides boost to deliver top-end power.

The 10-speed box reduces the gaps in power and acceleration between gears, providing smoother acceleration, and improved performance . The electronic control system features real-time adaptive shift-scheduling, engineered to help select the correct gear at the right time, including skip-shift and direct downshift capabilities.

The unit’s Progressive Range Select (PRS) system gives the driver the ability to lock out gears from the automatic shifting range for improved control. When selected the available gears are shown on the instrument cluster, with the current gear indicated. Only the available gears are then displayed, and the transmission automatically shifts between these ratios. The suspension has also been tweaked. The front-mounted stabiliser bar has been moved to the rear of the front axle, which along with an increase in diameter and stiffness gives improved roll control and handling performance, which has also enabled a reduction in tyre pressures from 240 to 210 kPa for a more comfortable ride which I can attest to.

The Limited model we drove has Adaptive Cruise Control with Forward Collision Alert (which now recognises pedestrians, in addition to its ability to detect other vehicles), LaneKeeping Aid and Lane Departure Warning, Blind Spot Information System with cross-traffic alert, Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) and Auto High Beam Control.

The impressive standard safety package across the line-up extends to Electronic Stability Control (ESC) system with Traction Control (TC), Trailer Sway Control (TSC), Hill Start Assist (HSA), Hill Descent Control (HDC) on the 4×4 models, Load Adaptive control (LAC) and Roll Over Mitigation (ROM).

A full Category 1 Thatcham-specification alarm is now standard on all Everest XLS, XLT and Limited models for enhanced anti-theft security.

SYNC®3 with Navigation is standard on the XLT and Limited models, linked to the integrated eight-inch touch-screen colour display, two USB ports and Bluetooth connectivity. It is simply the best system in this category – easy to use and does what it says on the box.

The system has fully-featured embedded navigation, multi-touch gestures (such as swipe, slide, scroll and pinch-to-zoom), plus voice recognition that uses simple, real-world voice commands.

Tracks4Africa is included in the package, as well as access to maps for over 20 countries in Africa.

The Limited remains the range-topping model, offering customers a premium execution with a higher level of luxury and more active driving safety features.

The refreshed styling treatment includes side steps, along with high-intensity discharge (HID) headlamps (with automatic levelling and auto high-beam control)and LED daytime running lights. The cabin environment continues the luxury touches, with a dark roof lining, illuminated front scuff plates, eight-way power and heated front seats, powered panoramic glass moonroof, as well as adaptive ambient lighting with multiple colour choices to suit the driver’s mood.

Access to the load compartment is facilitated by the a powered tailgate, while the 50:50 split third-row rear seats can be lowered or raised electrically for seven-seat configuration.

The exhaustive list of active driving safety features on the Everest Limited is top class. This includes Adaptive Cruise Control, Forward Collision Alert with Autonomous Braking, Lane Keeping Aid and Lane Departure Warning, Blind Spot Monitoring System (BLIS) with cross-traffic alert, Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS), and Semi-Automatic Parallel Park Assist (SAPPA).

Pricing of the Everest range is as following: 2.2 TDCI XLS 6AT 4X2 R499 900,  2.0 Turbo XLT 10AT 4X2 R584 900,  2.0 BI Turbo XLT 10AT 4X2 R624 100, 3.2 TDCI XLT 6AT 4X4 R644 000,  2.0 BI Turbo XLT 10AT 4X4 R687 700 and the model we drove the 2.0 Bi-turbo Limited 10AT 4X4 R761 200.

Direct competitors are the Mitsubishi Pajero Sport, Discovery Sport, Isuzu mu-X, Kia Sorento and Toyota Fortuner. Also look at the Subaru Forester, VW Tiguan Allspace, Suzuki Grand Vitara, Volvo XC60 and Mercedes GLC.

The Everest Limited takes Ford’s SUV offering to the next level. In my opinion it is the best of the bakkie based SUVs and beats many of the others because of its versatility and ability to be both family car and adventure off-roader.

Ford Protect, comprises a four-year/120 000km comprehensive warranty, three-year/unlimited distance roadside assistance and five-year/unlimited km corrosion warranty. A six-year/90 000km service plan is included.

 

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Defender gets a new look

It looks svelt, but can it do veld?

 

Land Rover Defender 110

The off-road icon is back, well soon anyway.
At the heart of Land Rover, the brand, is the Defender. A tough no-nonsense workhorse in the past. The big question with the new one is: Is it as tough as the old Landy?
Hard to say just yet, but there is much to be happy about, on paper at least.
New Defender will be available in 90 (short wheel base) and 110 (long wheel base) body designs, with up to six seats in the 90 and the option of five, six or 5+2 seating in the 110.

Defender remains a beast of burden with a maximum payload of up to 900kg, static roof load of up to 300kg, dynamic roof load of 168kg, towing capacity of 3,500kg and wading depth of up to 900mm. The wheels are still in the corners allowing for excellent approach and departure angles.
A dash-mounted gear shifter is used to accommodate an optional central front ‘jump’ seat, which provides three-abreast seating across the front just like early Land Rovers.

Alex Heslop, Director of Electrical Engineering, Jaguar Land Rover, says: “The new Defender is a future-proofed 4×4 for the 21st century, using the latest technologies to optimise efficiency, enhance capability and revolutionise connectivity. With software updates that are sent over the air and next-generation always-on touchscreen infotainment, new Defender is every bit as pioneering today as the original Land Rover was in 1948.”

The new Defender has Land Rover’s (also new) Electrical Vehicle Architecture, which includes a state-of-the-art forward-facing digital camera, advanced ultrasonic sensors and 3Gbit/s onboard network supporting a comprehensive suite of driver assistance technologies. These include a 3D Surround Camera providing both 360-degree plan and new 3D exterior perspective views of the surrounding area, both off and on road providing enhanced augmented on-screen visualisation when using Tow Sensing, Wade Sensing and Land Rover’s ClearSight Ground View transparent bonnet technology, to improve visibility of the vehicle’s surroundings.

The new body architecture provides ground clearance of 291mm and world-class off-road geometry, giving the 110 approach, breakover and departure angles of 38, 28 and 40 degrees (Off Road height) respectively. Landy no longer uses the old ladder-frame chassis but has opted for a new lightweight aluminium monocoque construction to create a much stiffer body structure, they call D7x (for extreme).

When launched locally, diesel power will be provided by a 177kW D240 engine, with sequential twin turbo technology providing 430Nm of torque and fuel economy of 7.7 l/100km and CO2 emissions of 204g/km (NEDC equivalent). Acceleration from 0-100km/h comes in a leisurely 9.1 seconds.
Petrol power comes from a powerful 3.0-litre P400 featuring mild hybrid electric vehicle (MHEV) technology with 294kW and 550Nm. The in-line six-cylinder Ingenium petrol engine features a conventional twin-scroll turbocharger and delivers 0-100km/h in 6.1 seconds and claimed fuel consumption of 9.9l/100km with CO2 emissions of 226g/km (NEDC equivalent).

The engines are coupled to an eight-speed ZF automatic gearbox with high and low range , centre differential and optional Active Locking Rear Differential.

HyperFocal: 0

A new Satin Protective Film option makes the exterior paintwork even more durable. The sustainable, solvent-free and completely recyclable wrap helps protect against everything from car park scratches to bramble rash and will be available as a factory-fitted option with Indus Silver, Gondwana Stone and Pangea Green colours, providing a unique contemporary finish as it protects. Opting for this finish is a no-brainer.
No less than four Accessory Packs are available: The Explorer, Adventure, Country and Urban Packs. I recommend the Adventure pack which features an integrated air compressor, exterior side-mounted gear carrier, seat backpack, portable rinse system, spare wheel cover, bright rear scuff plate and mud flaps.

In addition to the Accessory Packs, new Defender is available with a wide variety of accessories from a remote control electric winch, rooftop tent and inflatable waterproof awnings to more conventional tow bar systems and roof racks.

Prices for the Defender 110 at launch, in the first half of 2020, will start at R910 400. While the expected price of the 90, to follow in the second half of 2020, will start at R830 300 (TBC).

The direct competition is the Mitsubishi Pajero, Nissan Patrol and various Toyota Land Cruisers.

 

Mitsubishi Triton 2.4 Di-DC Double Cab facelifted

What’s in a face?

Take the facelifted Triton. The nose has changed. So, new face. You either love it, or hate it.

Otherwise there is much to love about the Triton, with a nose job.

Mitsbishi Triton T2.4L DI-DC A/T 4X4

At the very least a car’s face tells us something of the intentions or plan for the car. It it a puppy dog or a bulldog?

Mitsubishi claims “The new face incorporates the new-generation “Dynamic Shield” front design concept. The high hood line and beefier-looking headlights located higher up give the new model a more powerful and imposing frontal appearance.” Moving on…

The Triton has their MIVEC DOHC Intercooled Turbo Diesel with Common Rail Direct Injection producing 133kW@3500rpm and 430Nm@2500rpm using a new 6-speed A/T box.

Mitsubishi claims 8.3L/100km for the Combined Cycle.  I got 9.8L/100km.

The other big news is the new 6-Speed Automatic Transmission with Intelligent Shift Control, delivering the optimum balance of engine power, fuel economy and interior quietness with smooth acceleration at low engine revolutions. The latest version Super Select II 4WD system has an Off-road Mode available on the automatic transmission derivatives. The Off-road mode has GRAVEL, MUD/SNOW, SAND and ROCK (in 4LLc only) settings for improved traction on different road surfaces. This system is possibly the best there is. If you get into trouble you also have a rear diff lock. Triton is rated to tow a braked trailer of 3100kg.

The 4H drive mode distributes torque in a 40:60 ratio between the front and rear wheels via a Torsen limited-slip device for safer on-road driving in slippery conditions such as gravel and wet roads.

Mitsubishi’s unique Super Select II 4WD system offers four different drive modes for improved driver control and passenger safety. The 4H drive mode distributes torque in a 40:60 ratio between the front and rear wheels for safer on-road driving in slippery conditions i.e. dirt, gravel and wet roads. 4HLc (4WD High range with CD locked) distributes torque equally between the front and rear wheels for improved traction on sand, dirt and slippery surfaces like snow. 4LLc (4WD Low range with CD locked) provides greater torque for extreme off-road conditions.

I personally like the interior and the way the Triton just works, design wise (let’s leave the nose out of it) and technically.
“The new Triton is engineered to be tough and looks the part,” says Nic Campbell, General Manager of Mitsubishi Motors South Africa. “We are confident that the upgraded version will build on the popularity of the original Triton and the 40 years of development of this iconic pick-up.”

From the gear selector to the brakes, the steering – all the elements have been honed to be spot on. A more pleasant bakkie to drive will be hard to find.

The Triton has no less than 15 active safety and driver assistance systems, too numerous to mention. Suffice to say it’s got everything you want.

A high-quality look is created with soft pad materials and stitching on the floor console, armrests and parking brake. Functions include tilt and telescopic adjustable steering column with multi-function leather steering wheel with audio and cruise control, to dual-zone automatic air-conditioning and chromatic rear-view mirror.

The electrically adjustable driver’s seat allows you to get comfortable behind the wheel. The other seats are all comfortable and there is adequate legroom at the back.

Also look at the Isuzu D-Max, Mazda BT-50, Nissan Navarra, Toyota HiLux, GWM Steed and Ford Ranger.

The 2.4L DI-DC M/T 4×2 costs R509 995, 2.4L DI-DC A/T 4×2 – R529 995
2.4L DI-DC M/T 4×4 – R569 995 and 2.4L DI-DC A/T 4×4 – R589 995.

Triton is covered by a warranty of 3 years or 100 000km and a 5-year / 90 000 km Service Plan.

The manufacturer’s warranty is for 3 years / 100 000 km. Road Side Assistance is for 5 years with  unlimited mileage. The service plan is for 5 years or 90 000 km. Service Intervals: Every 10 000 km.

Haval H9 reviewed

Be prepared to be surprised with the new big SUV from Haval.

Haval H9 2.0 Petrol 4WD Luxury

The H9 2.0 Petrol 4WD Luxury from Haval breaks new ground in our market. It is an apparently tough offroad capable, luxury seven-seater, real SUV with all the bells and whistles you could wish for. Let’s say it immediately. The H9 is by far the best Chinese vehicle I have ever driven. If it had a Toyota or Hyundai badge it would already be selling hundreds of units a month possibly. It really is that good. Watch this space.

I predict that in five years Haval will have the brand recognition and cachet which Hyundai so richly deserves and enjoys now. Already the H9 outperforms the Sant Fe in some areas, bearing in mind that the new big one from Hyundai has moved upmarket and grown a bit in size.

Competition for the Haval H9 is divided into two camps. Those with real 4×4 capability and softroaders.

Haval H9

The real offroaders include the Suzuki Grand Vitara, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Toyota Prado and Fortuner, Ford Everest, Mitsubishi Pajero Sport and Isuzu mu-X.

Softroaders will include the Kia Sorento, Toyota Rav4, Discovery Sport, Nissan X-trail, VW Tiguan Allspace, Peugeot 3008 and Volvo XC60 AWD.

Looking at the list you can see that the competition is stiff in this segment, so value-for-money will be key.

Viewed from a little distance the H9 looks a bit like a cross between a Land Cruiser and a Patrol, so it looks the part, but it is technically more like a Fortuner. It is a big car but not out of proportion, more fit for purpose.

Haval H9 2.0 Petrol 4WD Luxury interior

Inside the Haval is impressive. The leather front seats offer both heating and cooling and are electrically adjustable, the driver’s eight ways. It is easy to set up a really comfortable driving position. The dash is well equipped and laid out, with an eight-inch touchscreen with satnav, personalisable LCD instrument cluster, three-way climate control and a good sound system. The drive mode controls are on the tunnel between the seats. It has a long list of standard features in both the luxury as well as safety departments. All-in-all an impressive cabin with high perceived quality levels.

You may wonder, can a Chinese brand deliver high quality? Well, Haval is part of GWM which sells a million vehicles a year and their Steed bakkies have been holding up well locally without many complaints from owners. They have around 35 dealers in place already and the list is growing rapidly. In the Cape they have dealers in Malmesbury, Claremont, Goodwood and Cape Gate.

The H9 only comes with a 2.0 L direct-injection turbo-petrol engine delivering 180kW and 350Nm through an eight-speed ZF gearbox and a 4×4 system with eight modes. Borgwarner provides the transfer case, Eaton the limited-slip differential and Bosch the electronic stability control system. Pretty big names backing the off-road performance. It is a pity they do not offer a turbo-diesel variant.

Haval H9

Expect fuel consumption of just under 12 L/100km unless you are off-road when all bets are off. The car is relaxing to drive due partly to the good driving position but also the good marriage between the drivetrain and engine. The H9 will make a Grand Tourer, especially if you are going to the game parks and wilder areas. On highway she just steams along happily at the legal limit.

Safety is taken care of by a full complement of active and passive safety systems.

If value-for-money is important to you, the H9 should be on your shopping list if you require real off-road capability.

For peace of mind the H9 comes with a five year or 100 000 warranty. The five-year or 60 000 service plan and a long and complete list of features is included in the R599 900 list price.

Originally published in AutoSold.

Ford Everest 3.2 TDCi Limited 4×4 6AT

Ford Everest 3.2 TDCi Limited 4×4 6AT

The beast from big blue. Revisited

Ford Everest Ltd

Ford Everest Ltd

The model we tested has huge 20″ tyres which may slightly inhibit you in rough terrain. I drove it on soft sand and on a muddy Helderberg 4×4 trail and experienced some slipping on the steep wet sections due to the highway orientated tyres and the, in my opinion, too low profile tyres. But I could go anywhere and with the right tyres, effortlessly.

The engine is the same one as in the bakkie and pushes out 147kW of power and 470Nm of torque. The terrain management system lets you shift-on-the-fly to maximise traction and stability. With 225mm ground clearance, 800mm wading depth, low range and the electronic locking rear differential, going anywhere is just the push of a button away. The system automatically transfers torque between the front and rear wheels with the most grip to provide maximum traction on and off-road.

Ford Everest Interior

Ford have put in Pull-Drift Compensation technology which measures the driver’s steering input, adapts to changing road conditions and helps compensate for slight directional shifts caused by factors such as crowned road surfaces or steady crosswinds. This together with the Watt’s linkage suspension and a silky smooth gearbox makes for an extremely competent ride. Much better than the bakkie, especially on fast gravel roads.

To get a better picture of this slightly bigger car I got my wife to drive it a bit. Here is what Danita has to say:
When I first set eyes on this vehicle I was quite intimidated by its bulk, so my immediate response was a bit on the negative side. I have made up my mind that this was a perfect example of the car that I would NEVER buy.
I nevertheless looked forward to a morning drive on sand, followed by a bit of 4×4.
We started to take pictures and the monster turned out to be quite handsome…beautiful lines and well designed. It stood there…a good height from the ground…proud and ready to please. The word “capable” is such an understatement!
Sooo…I decided to be bold and take it through it’s paces on the Helderberg 4×4 trail, come hell or high water. Well, during the past week it really was hell and high water, which made it….challenging for me and the beast.
I change my tune…I really stand in awe of the sheer power, willingness and capability of this lovely vehicle. It is such a pleasure to drive and not for one moment did I feel scared or in a panic…this was an adrenaline dream!

Ford claims 8.2L/100km but I was getting 10.8, so with its 80 litre tank it has a range of about 750km. Not bad for a vehicle of this size and with this power. It is rated to tow up to 3 tons braked and 750 kg unbraked.

The SUV is loaded with adaptive cruise control with collision warning, pre-collision detect, active park assist and a blind spot information system, not to speak of the automated lights and wipers. Its all top class stuff.

The car has front seat warmers, and seats which fold flat right to the front seat, which would make a great bed in lion country. Something you can’t do in the Fortuner with its silly fold-up third row seats.
Ford’s SYNC® 2 infotainment system has active noise cancellation, Bluetooth and all the goodies you would want in such a system.
Oh, there’s a 230 volt inverter too.

The Everest as tested is R698 900. The moon roof is an extra R10 360. The base model costs R459 900. The top model starts at R706 900.  For both models the warranty is 4yr / 120 000km and comes with a 5yr / 100 000km service plan.

Ford Everest Ltd

Ford Everest Ltd

The Ford Everest and Toyota Fortuner are  very different. In town and on the road the Everest completely outboxes the Fortuner, but meets its match off-road. I think the Everest takes it.
Also look at the Fortuner, Mitsubishi Pajero Sport, Suzuki Grand Vitara, Jeep Cherokee, Kia Sorent and Hyundai Sante Fe (the latter two not offering low range).

 

Ford-Everest-Ltd-nose

Mitsubishi Pajero 3.2-litre 16-valve DI-DC review

Mitsubishi Pajero 3.2-litre 16-valve DI-DC

The evergreen “Pagy” has been with us a long time, winning the Dakar 12 times along the way. The fourth generation Pajero was launched in 2006, but is more of a revision of the third generation which was launched in 1999. It is tough, robust and can really go anywhere.

Mitsubishi Pajero SWB

The Pajero comes in two sizes. The first one we are reviewing is the smaller Short Wheel Base version with two doors. This makes it very wieldy, but access and the view from the back seats is an issue. The boot space is tiny. Think of it as the true successor of the WWII jeep. Just much more capable, better equipped and luxurious.

In 2015 the Pajero was updated with a new front fascia with a revised grille, LED daytime running lights and a new spare tyre cover as well as infotainment system. A thorough facelift which brought it up to date.

Pajero LWB leg-room is generous

The highlight of Pajero is the Super Select 4WD system, which means you can leave the Pajero in 4WD mode all the time if you wish. Activating the Pajero’s high-range four-wheel drive leaves the differential open so that the car can be driven on all surfaces. You can also select only the rear wheels, locked 4×4 high range or low range. The rear differential can be manually locked at the push of a button.

With 235mm of ground clearance, a 700mm wading depth, 36.6/25 degree approach/departure angles, and wheels with excellent articulation you get a virtually unstoppable machine. The front end features independent suspension with a double-wishbone coil spring and stabiliser bar. The rear features independent suspension with a multi-link coil spring arrangement with stabiliser bar.

You’d need to be doing something silly to get into trouble with the Pajero off-road, such is the system’s competence.

Pajero interior

The Pajero remains a favourite with caravanners and boaters with its 3000kg tow rating (with electric brakes, 750 kg unbraked), which is more than enough to tow a fair-sized van or boat for weekends away.

The interior is just right and is fully equipped. The dash has been upgraded and now offers a cluster above the infotainment system with a dot matrix display that incorporates the trip computer and four-wheel drive information. The speedometer and tachometer cluster features drivetrain information, along with the vehicle’s vital running status.

This Pajero is great for cruising and brilliant in sand, over rocks, whatever you throw it at.

For  R689 900 you get the car and a 5 year 100 000 km maintenance plan as well as a 3 year 100 000 km warranty. But:

Mitsubishi holiday promotion here.

Mitsubishi Pajero LWB

The normal or Long Wheel Base 4 door version is such a pleasure to go on tour with. You can throw anything at it, and it will just simply shrug it off. It is slightly old school, but in the best possible way.

The ground clearance is also 235mm, and the rest of the specs just like the SWB model.

The lights have been updated and it now has rear parking camera and sensors. The infotainment system has been brought up to date with inter alia Bluetooth and Handsfree Voice Control integrated into the Pajero’s multi-function steering wheel.

Mitsubishi Pajero LWB facelifted rear

I think the LWB  model is the one to get.

A completely new Pajero is expected later in 2018.

Get the latest prices here.

See review off-road in 2015.

Bass Lake 4×4 training

Bass Lake 4×4 training

Bass Lake 4x4 driver training

Bass Lake 4×4 driver training

04:45 N2 to Cape Town International.

What am I doing at this time on this road?

09:45 Boma, Bass Lake with coffee in hand. Jimny’s waiting outside. Ahh, now I know why.

Keep two wheels on the ground

Keep two wheels on the ground

Alan Pepper is a good instructor, but he is an even better story teller.

He has fairly strongly held views on matters off-road which I for the most part agree with. He gave us some really good advice and a solid theoretical grounding in 4×4 principles.

Then he let us loose on the very varied training ground, always on hand to show, to explain, to guide.

Alan has a fleet of 3 manual Jimnys and an automatic Grand Vitare.

We took turns getting the basics right and learning to read the road before lunch. That Malva pudding alone is worth the trip to Bass Lake.

After lunch the ten of us tackled the more adventurous section.  There are one or two inclines which I would have been inclined to avoid on my own. Not with Alan around. What a day.

One piece of good advice: “Drive the back wheels”.

Ooops. Getting it.

Ooops. Getting it.

Kyleigh Smith, Suzuki Auto SA’s PR Co-ordinator did a great job behind the scenes. Thank you Suzuki.

Speaking of which. Those Jimnys are great vehicles. Simple, solid engineering. The right stuff.