Staying Alive – Day three of Covid-19 lockdown #1

It’s proving to be a long start of a really long weekend. Peaceful, “rustig”, pleasant and relaxing it has been so far, but… for how long?
A cool breeze is pointing to the possible early onset of autumn here in the Cape. We were all hoping the warmer temperatures would chop the virus off at its suckers as was suggested early on in the episode. Not so sure about that any more.
Our garden is looking really good except for the patches of grass where the nineteen guinea fowl who reside with us in the complex have been decimating the lawn. My neighbour above me has had enough. Yesterday he grabbed a red towel and in his pj’s charged them like a matador. Confusion was the order of the day. They slipped back while we weren’t looking though. Tough fowls, these. Real survivors. I see a duel developing. With very fit guineas and a very fit neighbour.
My Lovey is spending a lot of time on her phone. This led me to think, what would we have done pre smartphone? The radio would have been on all day and we would have been on our phones whether cellular or landline talking to people, hearing their voices feeling their emotions. Now we seem more cut off than ever, as if it is a Survivor Virus reality type show. Don’t you feel its all a little surreal? Even dreamlike? As if we all discovered magic mushrooms at the same time. I find communicating via text is just not the same as talking to someone. Just chatting.
Lovey and I have just come back from a walk around the complex gardens which are quite spacious as the developer was generous with the space between buildings back in the day 30 years ago. We met a neighbour jogging and exchanged pleasantries at the two metre gap as required and chatted to another neighbour who was sitting in the sun reading. A real village feeling. A lucky village, as we have enough space, fair security and it is well kept.
On day three; puzzle number two. It is a 500 piece jigsaw puzzle of a dachshund. At least we know all the pieces are in play.
We have an issue with tiny ants which invade our house before rains or when their moisture in the air. Nothing is sacrosanct. As a result we now have ant flavoured cookies amongst other ant infused delicasies in the house. It s an acquired taste, but interesting. Wonder if this is a business opportunity. Ant infused gin. I mean, you can infuse gin with anything these days and make a buck.
Hang in there.

Running home – Day two of siege

Running home – Day two of siege

Made it painlessly through day one of the first SA Covid-19 lockdown. I expected the country to do it (easily) as we are experienced in stay-aways and strikes. Should have been a piece of cake. And it was, except for a few contrarian hold outs in traditionally revolutionary areas. Viva! Viva? Mmmm.

Looking back to Thursday and my experience of it, is interesting.

It hit me at about lunchtime on L-Day -1 that I could be short of my most important meds. We charged down to Clicks and Tops. My wife to find out about a Flu jab and me to stock up on a whisky, a couple of shumba quarts and a box of the sweet pink stuff for my Lovey. Mission possible, even went for a de-fleecing at my barber.

On the way back from filling up our water bottles at Oasis we noticed crowds of people queing up to get into the cash and carry. More than a hundred people with absolutely no social distancing whatsoever.

Really?

My Lovey was given a thousand piece puzzle of a typical Parisian street scene, complete with paintings on easels etc. We launched into the build with great enthusiasm. It is fun to build a puzzle together. Until you realise the reason the puzzle was given to you is that at least 10% of the pieces are missing. Bummer. So watched a bit of Bourne Supremacy for a while. For the third time, I think. The thing is the basic plot is good and the execution brilliant, both the acting and the cinematography is top class. I see all sorts of detail on the second and third viewing. Respect.

Speaking of viewing. Some of our local coverage of the whole “gedoente” is more than a little dodgy. Can our editors not train the junior reporters a bit before sending them out? As for the editing and programme construction. The less said the better. Some of the reportage is very good. Daily Maverick is doing an astounding job. They are curating the flow so as not to inundate the reader. That is good news management.

I did my parkrun 5 km this morning round and round the outer perimeter of our complex, on the inside if you know what I mean. A bit slower than I thought though. Strava does not lie. All of 36 minutes later I staggered into the flat for my second cup of Antigua French Roast. What a reward.

I decide mealiepap was just the thing for breakfast. Last week I had bought a packet of mealiemeal at Pick n Pay. A house brand of theirs called Livewell. I liked the packaging. Now I really should not be swayed by pack design. I have a degree in communication science and supposedly know all about the influence of design, packaging, colour on consumer behaviour, or should. No different to Iwisa. Dollied it up with a blob of butter and squirt of honey. Best survival food ever.

Its just as quiet here this morning as yesterday was. There is quite a plump cloud over the Dome of the Helderberg and a gentle breeze cooling the morning down. The doves are cooing and every now and then you hear the flutter of their wings. I am loving it.

I feel so sorry for the 1170 who have tested positive and their loved ones. With over 28 000 tests done so far it seems we are still below the curve.

Hope it stays that way.

#parkrun #root44

Staying home – a home trip

Staying home

It’s quite still this morning, Friday 27 March, two weeks before the first Good Friday of the new decade. More like a Sunday than the Friday it is.

The news we are hearing is not so good. The first two people have died here in the Western Cape and over a thousand fellow Saffas have tested positive. And this is only the very beginning.

All my alarms are switched off. I have invited nature back into my life. No deadlines, just the rhythm of the day. Bliss.

You must see how many birds and bugs share our garden with the cats and us. I am imppressed.

It is interesting that our government chose to emphasise that one of the victims died while being treated in a private health facility. The “us vs them” mentality so ingrained in our society needs to be flushed out, and quickly. I think most do not realise they are boxing themselves in like that. Self limiting. We are all in this together, whether we like it or not.

My cats are loving it. You can’t here cars, only bird song and chatter. The guineas are roaming the lawn, some say destroying it with their incessant digging others enjoying the sheer freedom the fowls enjoy. Both cats are near me, Gemmer half awake, eyeing the birds casually. Pebbles at peace with the world, doing what cats do so well, fast asleep on the table. I am more aware of the bugs and the buzzing around me. Life goes on.

Several older people live in my complex. They are a bit sombre and have been a bit more serious about it all.

Generation C starts today. The post Covid-19 generation will inhabit a different world to the one we knew. If their brains and tissue cells aren’t fried by 5G they will be caught up in a world of machines dictating their lives, or will they rebel? Say enough is enough. No more. The future will tell.

The youngsters born in the teen years are an amazing generation, better prepared to face the challenges ahead than most before them, I think. So maybe we will have better days ahead. Even the boys can multi-task up to a point.

Twenty-one days to go.

I am quite fortunate in that I have things to do. Hopefully some freelance work, a proposal for a remote learning system to develop, immersion in photography, building puzzles, sorting out the garage, just looking at the butterflies and the bees, working on my cooking skills, or lack thereof. Practice a bit for retirement. No time to be bored.

What will the 21 days bring?

Suzuki S-Presso freshly brewed

The S-Presso is a compact and affordable urban mini SUV with a choice of five model derivatives and two transmission options in SA. Its either a 5-speed manual or AMT (the latter using Suzuki’s Automated Gear Selection (AGS) technology for smooth shifts using a manual transmission with self-actuating clutch) transmission, GL, GL+ or S-edition trim level.

Suzuki S-Presso-180

“We are very excited to introduce the new Suzuki S-Presso in South Africa. It combines many of our most advanced technologies, such as our HEARTECT platform, with our compact SUV expertise to offer a compact, but roomy and well-specified new urban SUV that is truly within everyone’s reach,” says André Venter, divisional manager for sales and marketing at Suzuki Auto South Africa.

The new Suzuki S-Presso shares its 998cc engine with the established Suzuki Celerio. This three-cylinder engine is code-named K10B and offers 50kW at 5 500 r/min and 90Nm of torque at 3 500 r/min and consumption of around 5L/100km.

It is a small car and in a way replaces the rather mundane Alto with a much more funky and practical product.

All versions of the S-Presso are very well equipped and feature electric windows for the front occupants, rear parking sensors, air conditioning, power steering and a multi-information display, which includes information such as distance to empty, trip duration and distance travelled.

On the GL+ model, Suzuki has bumped up the specification with its easy-to-use functional infotainment system. This system is touch sensitive and includes full integration for most smartphones through the in-built Apple CarPlay and Android Auto systems.

This  system also offers USB and auxiliary ports and Bluetooth connectivity as standard and will display the image from the in-built reverse camera on the screen.

S-Edition models retain the infotainment system and mirror the silver detailing on the exterior with similar highlights on the centre console, air conditioning louvres and side door panels.

The range starts at R134 900 for the GL manual and tops off at R160 900 for the S-edition AMT.

It comes with a 5-year / 200 000 km mechanical warranty, one year insurance and two year service plan.

The Renault Kwid is the most obvious alternative, but also look at the Mahindra KUV100, Fiat Panda and Haval H1.

#Doyou #Suzuki #S-Presso

Audi A1 35 TFS1 review

The baby from Ingolstadt is quite a little charmer and feels sporty, smart and upmarket as befits any model sprouting the four rings of Audi.

The A1 just looks right, both on the outside and in the cosseting cabin. The styling is in my opinion spot on and the quality is, well, Audi. Its smart and feels premium. The new model builds and improves on the previous generation and won’t disappoint Audi fans.

Audi Ai 35 TFSi

The nose of the new models has been quite radically changed with a new bigger grille, model specific LED daytime running lights and other changes depending on the options selected. The car as a whole is quite a bit bigger than the original.

The performance and handling is sorted and feels sporty. It is clearly aimed for life in the city, although she will soak up the long road. If you are planning t overtake when the car is fully loaded it may be worth your while to select sport mode as the normal mode will be a little leisurely for some at the moment you floor the volume pedal.

The point is – this car is fun to drive anywhere, especially in Sport mode. Aficionados of the four rings brand will love the new baby from Ingolstadt.

 

The cabin of the A1 is top class and really well laid out. The dash is a little busy. but that is just quibbling. I don’t think you will have any complaints. The bright yellow trim may become a bit much but I kinda liked it. Gives the whole look a youthful zest. The Audi optional MMI display system is impressive and functional, if a little excessive.

The 1.5L turbo-petrol engine produces 110kW and a pretty good 250Nm through the tried and tested VW group 7-speed S tronic box to deliver a satisfying driving experience. I only managed to achieve 9L/100 km in town, but the long term average consumption of the car is 8L/100 km in mixed driving. With a heavy foot in Sport mode expect around 10L/ 100 km and if you really drive with economy in mind you may get 7L/ 100 km.

The car we drove has a total value of R602 500, which includes a long list of optional accessories to the value of R143 600. These include obvious extra accessories like a fancy Bang & Olufsen sound system at R9 500, special 18 inch alloy wheels at R15 600, MMI navigation plus limited Audi connect at R24 500, a black roof at R10 600 and park assist at R13 000.

Some not so obvious extras are the climate and cruise control at R10 300, powered external mirrors for R4 100, leatherette cover for handbrake lever an astounding R2 500, headliner in black at R3 000 and the leather steering wheel at R3 400.
The seats also cost more than standard and the virtual cockpit and smartphone interface is R9 900.

This means the bare car at R458 900 must be quite a plain bare bones affair. Do not judge the car by the pictures you see, especially the dash as it alone has been upgraded by about R45 000.

There are three models in the A1 Sportback range:
30 TFSi with a three cylinder 1L engine at R359 900 (same as standard T-Cross)
35 TFSi with four cylinder 1.4 engine at R458 900 (what we tested)
40 TFSi with four cylinder2.0L engine at R488 000 (driver’s delight)
These are quite basic cars at list prices so plan on adding R100 000 worth of equipment or finishes to the car of your choice as well as either the S-line pack or advanced spec level.

Alternatives include the Mazda3 Astina, Mini Cooper Hatch, as well as the BMW 118I, Honda Civic Hatch and VW Polo GTI with a bit of a stretch.

First published in AutoSold.

Audi Q3 S-line 35 TFSI S-tronic review

She is turbo blue. Very, very blue.

Audi Q3 S-line 35 TFSI S-tronic

She is seriously sassy and has a pair of hips to make das Bavarian Mädchen blush.

Audi’s Q3 is a thing of beauty, from the neatly ironed crease lines to her alcantara trimmings to her stunning dashboard with its oh so smart displays.

Altogether a great work of design. Although I must say I think her mouth is a little big, but let’s not quibble.

Let us also put the elephant in the room to pasture. What with the R152k optional extras fitted to our review car the sticker price is a little eye watering at three quarters of a million Rand, for a subcompact luxury crossover SUV designed for on-road use.

If you have the cash lying around and your heart says yes, you will enjoy this car.

Q3 enjoying the gravel in Betty’s Bay.

I found the engine somewhat laggy and the gearbox a little undecided, but if you are “rustig” and not in a rush, all is well.

Audi claims a 0-100 kph sprint time of 8.9 seconds and it’ll run to a top speed of 204 kph. The Q3 sits well on the road like all Audi’s do and the steering is satisfactory. I got around 7.5L/100km on the open road and around 12L/100km in town, partly perhaps because the little 1.4 engine which puts out 250Nm and 110kW, is working hard (but willingly) to move the relatively large body. Hopefully Audi will add the 2.0L engine soon to the line up. Now that will be a winner.

Audi have chosen wisely in the wheels department, the 18inch 235 x 55 tyres 100v from Hankook give just the right amount of feedback without becoming harsh. A very good compromise and just another example of how well thought out this car is from a design and styling point of view.

The cabin is a pleasure to be in. There are 3 trim levels: Standard, Advanced and S Line. The MMi (multimedia) selector wheel of previous Audis, which was good for inputting instructions when the car was bouncing along a road, has been removed. Personally I think the large touchscreen, good as it is, at the expense of real buttons is a bridge too far. It’s hard to hit the icons with a jiggling finger, however sharp the image may be. One tends to leave fingerprints on the screen as well. Thankfully the climate control retains actual knobs. Audi’s Virtual Cockpit digital instrument cluster is standard and includes all the information you really need.

The rear legroom is good, partly because the seats can slide backwards or forwards depending what your greatest need is – boot space or leg room. In fact the cabin feels quite roomy.

There are four equipment and two styling packages.

The Comfort package at R21 500 adds electric seats with 4-way support and heating, electrically opening and closing boot gate, and park distance control. The Technology package adds MMi navigation, virtual cockpit plus and ambient lighting at R33 500.

For R34 900 you can get the Sport Package which will give you 19 inch cast alloy wheels, 20-spoke V style, Alcantara/leatherette combination upholstery, headlining in black and  ports contour leather-wrapped steering wheel, 3 spoke, flat-bottomed, with shift paddles and multifunction plus.

Finally the S line Interior Package offers bespoke S line styling elements which add a distinctively sporty look to the interior for R15 900.The Black package changes bright trim to black while the parking package adds a 360° camera and park assist for R26 500.

Pricing

The basic trim level costs R565 000, the advanced line R585 000 and the S line R599 000.
A five-year or 100 000 maintenance and repair plan is included.

Cars offering similar specification or space include the VW Tiguan, Volvo XC40, Jaguar E-pace, Mercedes Bens GLA, Peugeot 3008, Mini Countryman, Kia Sportage and Mazda CX5.

Hyundai i30N launched

Hyundai’s i30 N performance hatchback has been developed with the the theme “Fun to Drive”: Cornering, Race-track Capability and Everyday Sports Car.

Hyundai i30N

Based on the i30 five-door, the i30 N is a very different beast with i’ts own unique design.

The ‘N’ stands for Namyang, Hyundai Motor’s global Research and Development Centre in Korea, and for the world-famous Nürburgring motor racing complex in Germany, home to Hyundai’s European Test Centre where the manufacturer’s models built on the European continent are developed and tested.

The i30 N underwent 10 000 km of driving on the Nordschleife circuit at the Nürburgring to test its durability.

“We aren’t afraid to do things differently here. Our N cars balance performance and practicality so that they are fun to drive every day. Every N car loves cornering, hence the nickname we have given to their character: ‘Corner Rascal.’ Whether it’s urban commuting or track driving, N handles it beautifully,” says Albert Biermann president and head of the Vehicle Performance Division.

The South African version is equipped with a Performance Package that – apart from the other N-features – include the high-output 202 kW turbocharged engine, an Electronically Controlled Limited Slip Differential, a variable exhaust valve system and 19-inch alloy wheels with 19-inch wheels with 235/35R19 Pirelli P-Zero high-performance tyres.

Buttons on the steering wheel alternate the i30 N’s five drive modes: Eco, Normal, Sport, N and N Custom. Each mode changes the car’s character, adjusting the high-performance parameters of the vehicle, including its engine and rev matching.

To help performance the n is equipped with electronically controlled suspension (ECS) and an electronically controlled limited slip differential
Hyundai claim a top speed of 250 km/h and acceleration from 0-100 km/h in just 6.1 seconds. That is all thanks to the powerful T-GDi engine, generating 353 Nm torque from 1 500-4 700 rpm, reaching a maximum of 378 Nm for a brief period when in overboost.

The South African i30 N dealerships are: Belville, Somerset West, Port Elizabeth, Durban South, Pinetown, Umhlanga, Richard’s Bay, East Rand, The Glen, Sandton, Roodepoort, Centurion, Wonderboom and Polokwane.

The i30 N can be serviced at all Hyundai dealerships in South Africa, Botswana Namibia and Eswatini.
Price

The Hyundai i30 N goes on sale at a suggested retail price of R 679 900, which includes a 7-year/200 000 km warranty, roadside assistance for 7-years or 150 000 km, and 5-year/75 000 km service plan. Service intervals are 15 000 km or once a year.

VW Amarok Canyon the most fun Leisure Bakkie

VW Amarok Canyon

The VW Amarok 3.0TDI V6 4Motion Canyon is Leisure Wheels magazine’s Bakkie of the Year.

The German bakkie, up against nine other double cab bakkies for the crown, scored 90.5% ahead of Ford’s Ranger Raptor (86.3%) and Toyota’s Hilux 2.8GD-6 Legend 50 (85.4%). The new competition format revolves around Average Joe’s bakkie requirements, and not flippant matters such as 0–100km/h acceleration times.

Instead, the competition focused on real-world issues such as fuel consumption, load carrying ability, towing, safety, handling, 4×4 ability, interior, long-term ownership and, counting 20% of the overall score, a subjective driving test score, as adjudged by five industry experts and professional drivers.

The Leisure Wheels test lab.

The results are:
1) Volkswagen Amarok 3.0TDI 4Motion Canyon AT 90.5%
2) Ford Ranger Raptor 86.3%
3) Toyota Hilux 2.8GD-6 4×4 Legend 50 (manual) 85.4%
4) Ford Ranger 2.0 Bi-Turbo 4×4 Wildtrak AT 83.4%
5) Mercedes-Benz X350d 4Matic 81.6%
6) Isuzu D-Max 3.0DT 4×4 LX (manual) 78.9%
7) Nissan Navara 2.3D 4×4 Stealth AT 78.8%
8) Mitsubishi Triton 2.4Di-D 4×4 AT 75.9%
9) Mahindra Pik Up 2.2CRDe 4×4 Karoo 70.4%
10) Toyota Land Cruiser 79 Namib 64.2%

The Raptor is wide and has an almost mean stance.

“Our aim with this test was to focus on real-world factors that affect real bakkie owners, and to go the full nine yards establishing those results. For the fuel consumption test, conducted on Gerotek’s high speed oval, we devised a set route that included stop-and-pull-off simulations, full throttle overtaking simulations, as well as slow and high speed laps. We also added 190kg to the bak, so the results are what consumers can realistically expect to achieve, on a daily basis,” explains Leisure Wheels’ Danie Botha.

And what is it about the Amarok that set it apart from the rest of the pack? Is it really perfect in every which way?

“It’s certainly not perfect,” says Botha. “It didn’t score well in the 4×4 ability, long-term ownership and safety segments. But for the rest, it really is a solid, classy package. It seems VW’s engineers worked some kind of magic with the leaf-sprung rear suspension, offering an SUV-like ride on all surfaces. And that V6 engine… here’s a bakkie that will outrun many hot hatches between traffic lights, yet it can carry nearly a ton on the bak.”

The March issue, featuring the comprehensive Bakkie of the Year report, goes on sale on Monday, 17 February. More detailed results in the respective segments will be published on leisurewheels.co.za.

VW T-Cross 1.0 R-Line review

Very soon Volkswagen will offer a full range of SUVs, some will be soft roaders, others like the Tiguan, more capable off the beaten track.
Although the T-Cross is built in Spain, it is interesting that VWSA built 161 954 vehicles in 2019, which is the highest production volume the Uitenhage plant has achieved since it began manufacturing Volkswagen vehicles in 1951.

Of the 161 954 vehicles, 108 422 were manufactured for export and 53 532 were produced for the local market. The production volume consists of 131 365 Polos and 30 589 Polo Vivos.

The T-Cross is the entry level crossover in VWs SUV range. It is not really that capable offroad but on gravel, on the highway and especially in town it does a really good job. It does have a slightly higher road height at 180 mm but for now at least only front wheel drive and at the moment only the little 3 pot 999cc turbo-petrol mill doing duty with one performance level available for now, 85 kW with 200 Nm, more than capable for around town. A detuned 70kW version of this motor and a 1.5 TSI engine with 110kW are on the way. You can order one already.

 

VW T-Cross at Moulie Point

Things to like

  • Looks – she is certainly a looker
  • Size  especially rear leg room
  • Ride is good, but I would prefer 16″ wheels and higher 60 profile tyres
  • Good visibility even for a short driver
  • The cockpit layout in the R-Line is very pleasant and functional. The VW multi-function steering wheel is a joy to use.

 

Little niggles

  • Start button behind gear lever on left
  • Hard plastics
  • Small boot
  • No climate control only air-conditioner, only mentioning it because it is an expensive little car
  • With my driving style I found the car had an irritating pause before the power came on. Its as if it misses a beat.

The optional ‘Energetic Orange’ design package makes the T-Cross truly eye-catching for the very young at heart:

VW T-Cross

• Seat covers in ‘Diag’ design with seat centre and inner sections in Orange and Ceramique
• Décor in ‘Transition’ 3D design in Energetic Orange and Grey
• Design element in steering wheel in Energetic Orange
• Exterior mirror housings in Energetic Orange
• Black 18 inch ‘Cologne’ wheels with Hot Orange finish for T-Cross Highline

Pricing

Note the review car has a few optional extras:

  • KESSY Keyless entry
  • beats® Sound System
  • Park Package (Park Assist, Rear View Camera and Power-fold Mirrors)
  • Infotainment Package (Discover Media: 3D Map, App-Connect, Voice Control, Inductive Charging and Active Info Display)
  • LED Headlights and Rear View Camera
  • R-Line Exterior with 17-inch Manila alloy wheels

The Comfortline we drove costs R334 600 without the optional extras. The extras fitted to our test car cost R70 050, bringing the total cost to R415 035 including VAT.

The 1.0 TSI 85kW Highline DSG® costs R365 000 and the 1.5 TSI 110kW R-Line DSG®  is priced at R403 500.

T-Cross side-by-side with a Polo. You can see it is taller, wider and rides substantially higher.

Competition

Renault Duster 1.5dCi TechRoad auto R332 900 ¬- Best buy
• Ford EcoSport 1.0T Titanium auto R357 300
Haval H2 1.5T Luxury auto R329 900 – Good option, facelift just launched
• Mahindra XUV 300 1.5 TD R324 999
Suzuki Vitara 1.4T GLX auto R399 900 – Solid alternative
• Kia Seltos 1.6 EX auto R371 999
• Hyundai Creta 1.6 Exec LE auto R397 900

The warranty for the T-Cross is still only 3 years or 120 000 km.
The small SUV/ crossover market segment is wide open. Take your time and go and test drive a number of cars before deciding, especially the three cars which have been highlighted.

 

 

Citroën is back in 2020

Just when you thought the car market was settling down to enjoy burning fossil fuels for the last lap before the new technology takes over a beloved old marque returns to our shores for a third time. The Citroën brand has officially re-launched in South Africa after exiting the country at the end of 2016. This may have something to do with the new assembly plant in Namibia or with Brexit, or both. Time will tell.

This time as part of the PSA group and as a sister brand to Peugeot and as such will be serviced at any Peugeot Accredited Dealership nationwide.

Style and space seem to be the cornerstones of the new range. The cars certainly look a little different.
The range initially includes three model lines: the C3 hatchback, C3 Aircross and C5 Aircross.

For peace of mind a five-year/100 000 km service plan is included across the range, along with a warranty of the same length. Citroën will share dealership space with its sister brand, Peugeot.

Copyright William CROZES @ Continental Productions

C3 hatchback

“With its unique body style, personalised features and connectivity, the new C3 is a bold, fresh, modern car. It illustrates the ongoing Citroën product offensive!” said Xavier Peugeot, Citroën Brand Product Director

The C3 is built on the PSA Group A platform and includes a lot of tech like advanced driver assistance systems for lane departure alert and driver attention alert as well as a coffee break alert.

Mirror screen technology duplicates the driver’s smartphone screen directly on the vehicle’s central screen, whether Android or Apple.

The C3 line-up has a pair of 1,2-litre three-cylinder petrol engines, the first offering a naturally aspirated flavoured 60 kW and118 Nm linked to a five-speed manual gearbox and the other a turbocharged engine with 81 kW and 205 Nm mated with a six-speed automatic box.

The manual comes in Feel specification for R239 900, while the automatic is offered in Shine trim (for R289 900). Three body colours will be available – White, Platinum Grey and Sand – each in combination with a red roof.

C3 Aircross

The C3 Aircross, also comes in a choice of three colours: Platinum Grey, Soft Sand and Natural White, complete with “Spicy Orange” trim. There are two variants: Feel and Shine, both using the turbocharged 81 kW version of the 1,2-litre petrol engine linked to a six-speed auto box as standard.

Citroën’s Advanced Comfort® programme for enhanced spaciousness, modular design and brightness is a key element of the Aircross.

The C3 Aircross will cost you R339 900 in Feel trim and R359 900 in Shine.

C5 Aircross

The C5 Aircross SUV is Citroën’s new flagship and a key lever for the international growth of the brand,” says Linda Jackson, Citroën CEO.

The C5 Aircross, which comes in two forms and in three colours, Arctic Steel, Pearlescent White or Platinum Grey). The base model Feel costs R469 900 while the flagship Shine costs R509 900. Both employ the PSA 1,6-litre turbocharged four-cylinder petrol engine delivering 121 kW and 240 Nm via a six-speed automatic transmission to the front wheels.

Citroën claims the new C5 Aircross SUV is the most comfortable model in its segment, thanks to the Citroën Advanced Comfort® programme, Progressive Hydraulic Cushions® suspension and Advanced Comfort seats. Hydraulic buffers at either end of the suspension setup have all but eliminated bounce from the car’s drive, they say. This could be quite a big deal.

Aircross is highly modular with three individual sliding, folding and reclining rear seats, and best-in-class boot space. With the seats folded down there is 1 630 L, up from the 520 litres of space with seats and as far back as possible. Citroen says it has aimed for maximum practicality, building in cubby holes and stowage spaces all around the cabin.
There’s space inside for five adults.

The Citroën brand has always stood for technical and design innovation and quirky looks. It is the brand for someone who wants something a little different, a little chic.
Vive le difference!