Suzuki Swift Sport

Little firecracker from Suzuki

Fun on four wheels can mean many things. From a rough and ready offroader, a vehicle for journeys deep into nature or a track ready sportscar. Suzuki are really good at small fun cars. Their Jimny is amazing offroad and their new Swift Sport is amazing on tar.

The Sport is one of those little grin-inducing machines, like a Mazda MX-5 which performs way above its price point. Sure, it is no Porsche or M-class Beemer but boy can it make a driver smile if not laugh out loud.

The Sport is the top of the range, one can almost say, aspirational model of the Suzuki Swift range. What sets it apart is the 1.4 turbo engine (as opposed to a normally aspirated 1.2), special sports seats with red stitching, additional instrumentation, twin exhausts and model specific body panels as well as upgraded suspension, wheels and brakes.

The Sport really makes a statement just sitting waiting for you, ready to leap on the road. Push the start button and the fireworks begin. It sounds right, the display looks right, the seats and steering wheel feel right. Press the loud pedal. Smiling already. I told you. Its fun, even to park at the mall.

Now, the 103kW and 230Nm on offer does not sound like a sports package, but remember the low weight at less than a ton, upgraded chassis, turbo and well matched box give this little runabout running legs. Grin factor. The Sport reaches 100km/h in less than 8 seconds, tops 200km/h and uses under 7 L/ 100 km depending on your right foot.

This is a car one tends to drive enthusiastically – throwing it around corners with abandon it just sticks to the road. Overtaking is effortless. You can use the paddles, but the auto box does the job superbly. Fun factor.

The interior is typically Suzuki but is well equipped and laid out. Not stunning, but neither is it shabby. I like it. The roof is quite high, even at the back, so for a small car even tall people will feel comfortable. Rear leg room is good for a super mini. The boot offers a not so great 242 litres, but it is okay for daily use.

Quite a few luxury items are included as standard, like rear camera, cruise control, infotainment system, climate control electric folding rearview mirrors.

The Swift Sport is well equipped on the safety front too, with 6 airbags, stability control and EDB and ABS.

The Swift Sport retails at R327 900 for the manual and R347 900 for the automatic we drove. This includes a 5 year or 200 000km warranty and 4 year or 60 000 service plan.

The ordinary Swift range starts at R171 900 for the 1.2 GA manual, R202 900 for the 1,2i GL SE to R224 900 for the GLX AMT.

I think the differences and upgrades justify the price. The competition, in the form of the VW Polo GTi at R411 900, Toyota Yaris GR (2021), Mazda MX-5 RF (R551 700) and the yet to be launched Hyundai i20N are all more, or much more, expensive.

Suzuki S-Presso freshly brewed

The S-Presso is a compact and affordable urban mini SUV with a choice of five model derivatives and two transmission options in SA. Its either a 5-speed manual or AMT (the latter using Suzuki’s Automated Gear Selection (AGS) technology for smooth shifts using a manual transmission with self-actuating clutch) transmission, GL, GL+ or S-edition trim level.

Suzuki S-Presso-180

“We are very excited to introduce the new Suzuki S-Presso in South Africa. It combines many of our most advanced technologies, such as our HEARTECT platform, with our compact SUV expertise to offer a compact, but roomy and well-specified new urban SUV that is truly within everyone’s reach,” says André Venter, divisional manager for sales and marketing at Suzuki Auto South Africa.

The new Suzuki S-Presso shares its 998cc engine with the established Suzuki Celerio. This three-cylinder engine is code-named K10B and offers 50kW at 5 500 r/min and 90Nm of torque at 3 500 r/min and consumption of around 5L/100km.

It is a small car and in a way replaces the rather mundane Alto with a much more funky and practical product.

All versions of the S-Presso are very well equipped and feature electric windows for the front occupants, rear parking sensors, air conditioning, power steering and a multi-information display, which includes information such as distance to empty, trip duration and distance travelled.

On the GL+ model, Suzuki has bumped up the specification with its easy-to-use functional infotainment system. This system is touch sensitive and includes full integration for most smartphones through the in-built Apple CarPlay and Android Auto systems.

This  system also offers USB and auxiliary ports and Bluetooth connectivity as standard and will display the image from the in-built reverse camera on the screen.

S-Edition models retain the infotainment system and mirror the silver detailing on the exterior with similar highlights on the centre console, air conditioning louvres and side door panels.

The range starts at R134 900 for the GL manual and tops off at R160 900 for the S-edition AMT.

It comes with a 5-year / 200 000 km mechanical warranty, one year insurance and two year service plan.

The Renault Kwid is the most obvious alternative, but also look at the Mahindra KUV100, Fiat Panda and Haval H1.

#Doyou #Suzuki #S-Presso

Audi A1 35 TFS1 review

The baby from Ingolstadt is quite a little charmer and feels sporty, smart and upmarket as befits any model sprouting the four rings of Audi.

The A1 just looks right, both on the outside and in the cosseting cabin. The styling is in my opinion spot on and the quality is, well, Audi. Its smart and feels premium. The new model builds and improves on the previous generation and won’t disappoint Audi fans.

Audi Ai 35 TFSi

The nose of the new models has been quite radically changed with a new bigger grille, model specific LED daytime running lights and other changes depending on the options selected. The car as a whole is quite a bit bigger than the original.

The performance and handling is sorted and feels sporty. It is clearly aimed for life in the city, although she will soak up the long road. If you are planning t overtake when the car is fully loaded it may be worth your while to select sport mode as the normal mode will be a little leisurely for some at the moment you floor the volume pedal.

The point is – this car is fun to drive anywhere, especially in Sport mode. Aficionados of the four rings brand will love the new baby from Ingolstadt.

 

The cabin of the A1 is top class and really well laid out. The dash is a little busy. but that is just quibbling. I don’t think you will have any complaints. The bright yellow trim may become a bit much but I kinda liked it. Gives the whole look a youthful zest. The Audi optional MMI display system is impressive and functional, if a little excessive.

The 1.5L turbo-petrol engine produces 110kW and a pretty good 250Nm through the tried and tested VW group 7-speed S tronic box to deliver a satisfying driving experience. I only managed to achieve 9L/100 km in town, but the long term average consumption of the car is 8L/100 km in mixed driving. With a heavy foot in Sport mode expect around 10L/ 100 km and if you really drive with economy in mind you may get 7L/ 100 km.

The car we drove has a total value of R602 500, which includes a long list of optional accessories to the value of R143 600. These include obvious extra accessories like a fancy Bang & Olufsen sound system at R9 500, special 18 inch alloy wheels at R15 600, MMI navigation plus limited Audi connect at R24 500, a black roof at R10 600 and park assist at R13 000.

Some not so obvious extras are the climate and cruise control at R10 300, powered external mirrors for R4 100, leatherette cover for handbrake lever an astounding R2 500, headliner in black at R3 000 and the leather steering wheel at R3 400.
The seats also cost more than standard and the virtual cockpit and smartphone interface is R9 900.

This means the bare car at R458 900 must be quite a plain bare bones affair. Do not judge the car by the pictures you see, especially the dash as it alone has been upgraded by about R45 000.

There are three models in the A1 Sportback range:
30 TFSi with a three cylinder 1L engine at R359 900 (same as standard T-Cross)
35 TFSi with four cylinder 1.4 engine at R458 900 (what we tested)
40 TFSi with four cylinder2.0L engine at R488 000 (driver’s delight)
These are quite basic cars at list prices so plan on adding R100 000 worth of equipment or finishes to the car of your choice as well as either the S-line pack or advanced spec level.

Alternatives include the Mazda3 Astina, Mini Cooper Hatch, as well as the BMW 118I, Honda Civic Hatch and VW Polo GTI with a bit of a stretch.

First published in AutoSold.

Audi Q3 S-line 35 TFSI S-tronic review

She is turbo blue. Very, very blue.

Audi Q3 S-line 35 TFSI S-tronic

She is seriously sassy and has a pair of hips to make das Bavarian Mädchen blush.

Audi’s Q3 is a thing of beauty, from the neatly ironed crease lines to her alcantara trimmings to her stunning dashboard with its oh so smart displays.

Altogether a great work of design. Although I must say I think her mouth is a little big, but let’s not quibble.

Let us also put the elephant in the room to pasture. What with the R152k optional extras fitted to our review car the sticker price is a little eye watering at three quarters of a million Rand, for a subcompact luxury crossover SUV designed for on-road use.

If you have the cash lying around and your heart says yes, you will enjoy this car.

Q3 enjoying the gravel in Betty’s Bay.

I found the engine somewhat laggy and the gearbox a little undecided, but if you are “rustig” and not in a rush, all is well.

Audi claims a 0-100 kph sprint time of 8.9 seconds and it’ll run to a top speed of 204 kph. The Q3 sits well on the road like all Audi’s do and the steering is satisfactory. I got around 7.5L/100km on the open road and around 12L/100km in town, partly perhaps because the little 1.4 engine which puts out 250Nm and 110kW, is working hard (but willingly) to move the relatively large body. Hopefully Audi will add the 2.0L engine soon to the line up. Now that will be a winner.

Audi have chosen wisely in the wheels department, the 18inch 235 x 55 tyres 100v from Hankook give just the right amount of feedback without becoming harsh. A very good compromise and just another example of how well thought out this car is from a design and styling point of view.

The cabin is a pleasure to be in. There are 3 trim levels: Standard, Advanced and S Line. The MMi (multimedia) selector wheel of previous Audis, which was good for inputting instructions when the car was bouncing along a road, has been removed. Personally I think the large touchscreen, good as it is, at the expense of real buttons is a bridge too far. It’s hard to hit the icons with a jiggling finger, however sharp the image may be. One tends to leave fingerprints on the screen as well. Thankfully the climate control retains actual knobs. Audi’s Virtual Cockpit digital instrument cluster is standard and includes all the information you really need.

The rear legroom is good, partly because the seats can slide backwards or forwards depending what your greatest need is – boot space or leg room. In fact the cabin feels quite roomy.

There are four equipment and two styling packages.

The Comfort package at R21 500 adds electric seats with 4-way support and heating, electrically opening and closing boot gate, and park distance control. The Technology package adds MMi navigation, virtual cockpit plus and ambient lighting at R33 500.

For R34 900 you can get the Sport Package which will give you 19 inch cast alloy wheels, 20-spoke V style, Alcantara/leatherette combination upholstery, headlining in black and  ports contour leather-wrapped steering wheel, 3 spoke, flat-bottomed, with shift paddles and multifunction plus.

Finally the S line Interior Package offers bespoke S line styling elements which add a distinctively sporty look to the interior for R15 900.The Black package changes bright trim to black while the parking package adds a 360° camera and park assist for R26 500.

Pricing

The basic trim level costs R565 000, the advanced line R585 000 and the S line R599 000.
A five-year or 100 000 maintenance and repair plan is included.

Cars offering similar specification or space include the VW Tiguan, Volvo XC40, Jaguar E-pace, Mercedes Bens GLA, Peugeot 3008, Mini Countryman, Kia Sportage and Mazda CX5.

PEUGEOT LANDTREK entering the One ton Pick-up segment later this year

Peugeot is entering the One ton Pick-up segment with the Landtrack later this year, just as Mercedes Benz is exiting with tail between the legs. Hopefully the French learnt a thing or two.

Peugeot Landtrack

It is based on the fundamentals of the segment says Peugeot: 3.5 t towing capacity, versatility, different body shapes, real off-road and overtaking capabilities with unbeatable robustness and ease of repair.

They say sub-sahara Africa is one of the initial launch areas, but give no indication of pricing.

I think the engines are borderline powerful enough for our market.

Diesel : 1.9L displacement and 111kW thanks to a variable geometry 16-valve turbocharger. Its torque of 350 Nm and 6-speed Getrag manual gearbox . It has chain timing to optimise maintenance costs. Roller rocker arms reduce noise, have higher speeds and less friction for less wear. This engine has a combined fuel consumption of 7.8L/100km,
Petrol : turbocharged with 2.4L displacement and a comfortable power output of 156kW and 320 Nm of torque combined with a 6-speed Getrag manual gearbox or a 6-speed Punch automatic gearbox with sequential, Sport or Eco modes.

The vehicle has a length of 5.33m for the double cab version and 5.39m for the single cab versions, all with a width of 1.92m.

The size of the cargo box is a central design element of the architecture and makes it possible to load:

2 “Euro-pallets” in Double Cab versions (1.63m x 1.60m x 500mm body and 1.22m wheel width),
3 “Euro-pallets” in Single Cab versions (2.43m x 1.60m x 500mm tipper and 1.22m wheel width).

For 4×4 versions, the front transmission is engaged using a dedicated thumbwheel to transmit some of the power to the front axle. This allows the driver to choose between 2 modes:

  • 4H (4 High speed) : for standard 4×4 use,
  • 4L (4 Low speed) short gear mode : thanks to a 2.7 to 1 reduction gearbox, an increase in torque at reduced speeds for driving in low-adhesion terrain or on steep slopes.

Finally, the rear differential is equipped with the eLocker system with automatic disengagement and provides extra traction when one wheel spins.

According to archywordlys Peugeot Landtrek is also not a completely independent design. It is based on the modern Changan F70 pickup truck introduced last year (Changan and PSA have a joint venture in China). The development of machines under the Chinese and French brands went in parallel, but the PSA joined the project later.

Renault Triber arrives

The Triber is a completely new car in South Africa.

It is a budget crossover 5-seater with an extra third row to make it a 7-seater if needed. You lose your boot though. The boot space is 625L in 5-seater mode. EasyFix seats allow for the 2 rear seats of the 3rd row to be completely removed to make a big boot. Interestingly there are separate aircon vent controls for the 2nd and 3rd rows.

The base or Expression model is quite basic and lacks the 8” touchscreen, rear speakers, side airbags, keyless entry, rear power widows, ECO mode, smartphone replication, LED headlights, electrical mirrors, and reverse parking camera which the other models have.

The Prestige enjoys an 8″ MediaNav Evolution touchscreen integrated with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility, Voice Command button and video playback on the screen, while a Smart Access Card for Keyless Entry and Stop/ Start functionality enable an easier driving experience.

The Triber is powered by the Renault 1.0 litre 3-cylinder turbo-petrol unit which generates 52kW with 96Nm torque. So do not expect much performance. Renault claims fuel consumption of 5,5L /100km. I think the Triber may battle a bit with seven up, especially up hills and at altitude. It appears that Renault is promoting the car as a five-seater and not as a seven seater, possibly because of the power to weight issue.

Pricing at launch is pretty good. The base Expression costs R164 900, the mid-range Dynamique is R174 900, while the ‘fancy’ Prestige is R189 900.

VW T-Cross 1.0 R-Line review

Very soon Volkswagen will offer a full range of SUVs, some will be soft roaders, others like the Tiguan, more capable off the beaten track.
Although the T-Cross is built in Spain, it is interesting that VWSA built 161 954 vehicles in 2019, which is the highest production volume the Uitenhage plant has achieved since it began manufacturing Volkswagen vehicles in 1951.

Of the 161 954 vehicles, 108 422 were manufactured for export and 53 532 were produced for the local market. The production volume consists of 131 365 Polos and 30 589 Polo Vivos.

The T-Cross is the entry level crossover in VWs SUV range. It is not really that capable offroad but on gravel, on the highway and especially in town it does a really good job. It does have a slightly higher road height at 180 mm but for now at least only front wheel drive and at the moment only the little 3 pot 999cc turbo-petrol mill doing duty with one performance level available for now, 85 kW with 200 Nm, more than capable for around town. A detuned 70kW version of this motor and a 1.5 TSI engine with 110kW are on the way. You can order one already.

 

VW T-Cross at Moulie Point

Things to like

  • Looks – she is certainly a looker
  • Size  especially rear leg room
  • Ride is good, but I would prefer 16″ wheels and higher 60 profile tyres
  • Good visibility even for a short driver
  • The cockpit layout in the R-Line is very pleasant and functional. The VW multi-function steering wheel is a joy to use.

 

Little niggles

  • Start button behind gear lever on left
  • Hard plastics
  • Small boot
  • No climate control only air-conditioner, only mentioning it because it is an expensive little car
  • With my driving style I found the car had an irritating pause before the power came on. Its as if it misses a beat.

The optional ‘Energetic Orange’ design package makes the T-Cross truly eye-catching for the very young at heart:

VW T-Cross

• Seat covers in ‘Diag’ design with seat centre and inner sections in Orange and Ceramique
• Décor in ‘Transition’ 3D design in Energetic Orange and Grey
• Design element in steering wheel in Energetic Orange
• Exterior mirror housings in Energetic Orange
• Black 18 inch ‘Cologne’ wheels with Hot Orange finish for T-Cross Highline

Pricing

Note the review car has a few optional extras:

  • KESSY Keyless entry
  • beats® Sound System
  • Park Package (Park Assist, Rear View Camera and Power-fold Mirrors)
  • Infotainment Package (Discover Media: 3D Map, App-Connect, Voice Control, Inductive Charging and Active Info Display)
  • LED Headlights and Rear View Camera
  • R-Line Exterior with 17-inch Manila alloy wheels

The Comfortline we drove costs R334 600 without the optional extras. The extras fitted to our test car cost R70 050, bringing the total cost to R415 035 including VAT.

The 1.0 TSI 85kW Highline DSG® costs R365 000 and the 1.5 TSI 110kW R-Line DSG®  is priced at R403 500.

T-Cross side-by-side with a Polo. You can see it is taller, wider and rides substantially higher.

Competition

Renault Duster 1.5dCi TechRoad auto R332 900 ¬- Best buy
• Ford EcoSport 1.0T Titanium auto R357 300
Haval H2 1.5T Luxury auto R329 900 – Good option, facelift just launched
• Mahindra XUV 300 1.5 TD R324 999
Suzuki Vitara 1.4T GLX auto R399 900 – Solid alternative
• Kia Seltos 1.6 EX auto R371 999
• Hyundai Creta 1.6 Exec LE auto R397 900

The warranty for the T-Cross is still only 3 years or 120 000 km.
The small SUV/ crossover market segment is wide open. Take your time and go and test drive a number of cars before deciding, especially the three cars which have been highlighted.

 

 

Ford Everest XLT Rrview

The sweet spot in the bakkie based SUV universe may just be held by Ford’s Everest XLT.

Ford Everest XLT

The Everest is a medium to large SUV with all the bells and whistler one could want, and the few goodies it is not equipped with as standard you can add on as optional extras or you can get the Limited Edition.

The Everest is perhaps the best of the large bakkie based SUVs available in SA. It is definitely the prettiest, has the best handling, cleverest packaging and a really good infotainment system. The design and operation of the third row of seats is streets better than the competition.

The interior is practical, well laid out and very comfortable to spend time in. I like the instrumentation which is comprehensive but uncluttered and clear. The cabin is very car like , well finished and uses pleasant materials.

Ford’s Synch3 infotainment system is one of the best on the market. It is easy to use, comprehensive and works first time. A joy to use.

The Everest feels fairly wieldy around town and is easy to park thanks to its various parking aids. Its easy to drive in town and a joy on the highway. A modern Grand Tourer especially in our context where bad roads and sand are to be expected during an extensive tour of especially our game parks and nature reserves.

The newish two litre diesel mill, built in Port Elizabeth, enjoys two turbos giving 500Nm and 157kW coupled to a superb 10-speed gearbox. Having 10 gears means a wider ratio-span, resulting in better acceleration and responsiveness in all driving conditions, matched to improved fuel efficiency of around 10L/100km if your foot is not too heavy. Very nice to drive.

Six models are available in the Everest range, starting off with the XLS 2.2 TDCi which provides an extremely competitive range of standard comfort, convenience and safety features.

Four XLT models are included in the new line-up, with the option of the all-new 2.0-litre Bi-Turbo and Single Turbo engines, along with the current 3.2-litre Duratorq TDCi.

I think the Everest is a better package than the Toyota Fortuner, Isuzu MU-x or Mitsubishi Pajero Sport,although the latter handles really well. It hits the sweet spot in this niche.

Bear in mind that you need to consider trim level, in our case XLT, type of engine and turbo set up, in our case 2.0 bi-turbo and 4×2 or 4×4, in our case 4×4.

Ford Everest XLT

Cost: the 2.0 BiT XLT 10AT 4WD we drove is listed at R701 500.

The range starts with the 2.2 TDCi XLS 6AT 2WD at R522 700.

The top-of-the-range 2.0 BiT LTD 10AT 4WD is a slightly eye-watering R776 500, but it is really very comprehensively equipped.

The warranty can be extended to  7 years or up to 200 000 km, but talk to your dealer for exact details. The standard warranty is 4 years /or 120 000km.

 

 

 

Ford Ranger Raptor review

The cherry on top of the double cab world. That’s one way of looking at it. VW supporters will argue the V6 Amarok is quicker in a straight drag, and it is. You could argue the MB 190kW X-Class V6 is pretty hot with its 190kW and a peak torque of 550Nm. And you would be quite right.

But. And its a big but.

Ford Ranger Raptor

The Raptor has something special about it.

It is special.

It is a double cab bakkie yes, but it is also a full blooded performance car. And how it performs on gravel and jeep tracks is most gratifying.

The secret is really the long-travel suspension. The rear is taken from the Everest giving it a car like ride but that is just the beginning. Ford and suspension hot shop Fox developed special high performance struts and widened the wheelbase by 150mm.

The cabin has also been finely tuned to reflect its sport bent. Special seats with technical suede, sporty steering wheel paired with lightweight magnesium paddle shifters, blue stitching trim and a top class electronic traction and handling package all contribute to a feeling that you are in a very special vehicle. I love it.

The Ranger Raptor’s Terrain Management System (TMS) includes a Baja mode, inspired by Mexico’s famous Baja Desert Rally, which enables ultra-responsive, high-speed off-road performance. In this mode, vehicle systems like Traction Control are pared back to allow spirited off-road driving without intervention from the vehicle’s on-board systems. Gear selection is optimised for maximum performance, and the mapping will hold gears longer and downshift more aggressively.

The Raptor is wide and has an almost mean stance.

The Raptor is equipped with 7 airbags, ABS with EBD, Electronic Stability Control with traction control, hill start assist, hill descent control, adaptive load control, trailer sway control and rollover mitigation.

Raptor comes in a range of colours of which the grey is my favourite.

A newly developed 2.0-litre bi-turbodiesel engine producing 157 kW and 500 Nm coupled to a ten-speed autobox gives this bakkie loads of performance and fairly good fuel consumption, dependent on the weight of your foot. It is fun to drive. In town, on the highway and most definitely on a gravel track.

Ford Raptor dash

Equipment levels are top class with literally everything you could want as standard.

Is it worth the extra cash? The Raptor has everything included in the sticker price. The Amarok Canyon is R799 000 plus R20k for the satnav infotainment pack. The Mercedes X350 is R904 188 without satnav or park assist etc. so its around a million.

So, if its the right car for you it is almost a bargain at R786 400.

Next year (2020) a new Isuzu bakkie will be launched to take on the Ranger, Amarok, X-class, Navara, Triton and the new bigger Steed, but for now I think the Raptor is the one with that little bit extra – the Mustang of bakkies.

Raptor has a  4-year /120 000 km comprehensive warranty, 5-year/unlimited km corrosion warranty, 3 years of roadside assistance, 6-year/90 000 km service plan with intervals every 15 000 km.

 

 

Ford Kuga 2.0T AWD ST Line review

Ford has been both generous and clever with the Kuga ST line. They offer the driver a responsive fun car to drive with sporty looks and fairly sporty performance and then add dollops of luxury items as standard for a very fair price.

It is both a luxury mid-size SUV and a sporty feeling car at the same time. And very good value for money in its segment.

I really enjoyed driving the ST Line ( note: not ST) Kuga and could live very happily with it even though it is not terribly economical in turbo petrol guise although Ford claims 8.7L/100km. I think most users will average around 10L/100km, although the diesel will be lighter.

Ford Kuga 2.0T AWD ST Line

The ST Line badging implies it is not a real ST high performance derivative, but rather has more performance and upgraded suspension than the standard models, a bit like Audi offers the S-Line trim, Mercedes-Benz the AMG Line, and a number of BMW derivatives bear M badges.

The interior is restrained but smart and practical. A very pleasant space to spend time in. The Synch3 infotainment system is one of the best out there. Nothing to fault in that department.

An electric tailgate is now standard on all Kuga derivatives and includes a leg-swing opening function, a feature that allows for hands-free operation of the tailgate (even if the car is locked), as long as the key is in your pocket. The function is activated by swinging your foot under the rear of the car to open the tailgate. The technique needs a little practice, but once mastered its pretty useful.

A nice surprise was the  240-Volt two-pin plug port provided for the rear passengers. Very nifty, I thought.

A reverse camera is standard across the range, so parking is easy. The view from the very comfortable and adjustable driving seat is commanding.

The suspension easily soaks up imperfections in the road and rough surfaces and, on smooth tarmac, the Kuga offers a premium, luxury experience. It drives and feels like a car, albeit higher of the tar.

While the suspension has been tweaked to be firmer for better handling, the engineers have achieved an admirable balance between comfort and sharper handling. Its really very good.

Available in Ambiente, Trend and Titanium specification levels, with 1.5 and 2.0-litre EcoBoost petrol engines or 2.0 TDCi diesel.

The 2.0-litre EcoBoost petrol engine has power and torque figures of 177 kW and 340 Nm, while the diesel gets 132 kW and 400 Nm with up to 40% less consumption than the petrol.

All Kugas have a four-year or 120 000km warranty.

Pricing is from R403,700 to R576,700. Fortunately they are well equipped, so what you expect is what you get.

The KUGA ST LINE SUV 2.0P 6AT AWD we drove costs R561 300, the diesel is R576 700. The model I like is the KUGA 2.0 TDCI TITANIUM POWERSHIFT 6AT AWD SUV at R530 600.

The Kuga is a good size, not too big, but also not cramped. With the the extensive specification, the above average handling and road holding and the great feel in mind, the Kuga must be on your list if you are looking at a medium sized SUV.